World Sepsis Day – September 13th

© Copyright 2019 Grief Probate Journey Blog *PLEASE NOTE THIS INFORMATION IS SOURCED FROM UK and AMERICAN WEBSITES* It is also based on our own experience. *We are not experts in this field, we are speaking purely on our own experience with information sought from the internet to give further examples. *

Please see World Sepsis Day – September 13th which covers:

  1. Introduction/Our Story
  2. World Sepsis Day – September 13th  (With illustrative examples)
  3. What is Sepsis
  4. Signs and Symptoms of Sepsis
  5. Sepsis and the “Elderly” (With illustrative examples)
  6. Sepsis and Children (With illustrative examples)
  7. Treatment for Sepsis
  8. Useful Links: World Sepsis Day – September 13th
  9. Our Final Thoughts and YouTube Video

1. Introduction/Our Story

This is a matter that is awfully close to my sister and I. During the time our Dad was hospitalised, due to his original diagnosis of Infective Endocarditis ( we have a topic on Infective Endocarditis, he, unfortunately, suffered many other various infections. One of which was Sepsis. What made this even more sad and shocking about this matter, is that we were not even informed at the time that our Dad had this. We only found out after a post-mortem had taken place.  Words will never be able to describe how the discovery of this news made us feel. It was yet another major let down in the journey of our Dad’s unfortunate illness and sadly passing away.

Sepsis is such a serious and life-threatening infection, that is why we will always try our best in any way possible to try and contribute to spreading awareness about it. We also have a topic on: Sepsis and Sepsis Awareness. Our most recent blog topic: September Awareness Month 2020 also has a section on Sepsis.

Please see: World Sepsis Day – September 13th

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2. World Sepsis Day September 13th (With illustrative examples)

2.1 What is World Sepsis Day?

“World Sepsis Day is held on September 13th every year and is an opportunity for people worldwide to unite in the fight against sepsis. … Likewise, it is poorly known that sepsis can be prevented by vaccination and clean care and that early recognition and treatment reduces sepsis mortality by 50%”.

2.2 World Sepsis Day – September 13

“someone signing the world sepsis day declaration with smartphone and coffee on the blue table. … Sep 1, 2020 … Sign the World Sepsis Declaration. It is like a”…

2.3 The 2020 World Sepsis Day Infographics: Brand-New Design

“23 Jan 2020 – The 2020 World Sepsis Day Infographics: Brand-New Design and Including the Findings from the Global Burden of Disease Sepsis Study”.

2.4 World Sepsis Day 2020: Inspiration, Ideas, and Resources for the perfect WSD event on September 13th

“21 May 2020 – World Sepsis Day 2020: Inspiration, Ideas, and Resources for the Perfect WSD Event on September 13”.

2.5 World Sepsis Day 2020 – National Awareness Days Events Calendar 2020

World Sepsis Day 2020 will be the biggest yet, with countless events in all parts of the world. There will be events for medical professionals, sport activities…”.

2.6 World Sepsis Day – UK Health Public Network

“Events / Awareness / World sepsis day. 13th September 2020. Date/Time Date(s) – 13/09/2020. All Day. Categories. Awareness”.

2.7 World Sepsis Day – African Sepsis Alliance

“On 9 September 2020, the World Health Organization and the Global Sepsis Alliance will host the ‘WSC Spotlight: Sepsis, Pandemics, and Antimicrobial”

2.8 World Sepsis Day | Sepsis Research (FEAT)

“25 Jan 2019 – World Sepsis Day is 13th September every year. It was established in 2012 by the Global Sepsis Alliance, a not-for profit charity which aims to” …

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3. What is Sepsis

3.1 What is sepsis infection?

“Sepsis is a potentially life-threatening condition caused by the body’s response to an infection. The body normally releases chemicals into the bloodstream to fight an infection. Sepsis occurs when the body’s response to these chemicals is out of balance, triggering changes that can damage multiple organ systems. (16 Nov 2018)”.

3.2 What is sepsis infection?

“It is a life-threatening medical emergency. Sepsis happens when an infection you already have —in your skin, lungs, urinary tract, or somewhere else—triggers a chain reaction throughout your body. Without timely treatment, sepsis can rapidly lead to tissue damage, organ failure, and death”.

3.3 Is there a sepsis charity?

“We work to raise awareness of sepsis among the public and health care professionals; encourage early diagnosis; lobby politicians to improve standards of care; and provide better support for sepsis survivors. With our supporters’ help, we are putting sepsis on the national and global agenda”.

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4. Signs and symptoms of Sepsis

4.1 Symptoms of Sepsis – NHS

Immediate action required: Call 999 or go to A&E if an adult or older child has any of these symptoms of sepsis: · acting confused, slurred speech or not making” …

4.2 Sepsis | NHS Inform

13 Feb 2020 – Sepsis symptoms in older children and adults · a high temperature (fever) or low body temperature · chills and shivering · a fast heartbeat · fast” …

4.3 What are the early warning signs of sepsis?

These can include:

  • “Feeling dizzy or faint”.
  • “A change in mental state – such as confusion or disorientation”.
  • “Diarrhoea”.
  • “Nausea and vomiting”.
  • “Slurred speech”.
  • “Severe muscle pain”.
  • “Severe breathlessness”.
  • “Less urine production than normal – for example, not urinating for a day. More items… (13 Feb 2020)

4.4 How does someone get sepsis?

“Sepsis happens when an infection you already have —in your skin, lungs, urinary tract, or somewhere else—triggers a chain reaction throughout your body. Without timely treatment, sepsis can rapidly lead to tissue damage, organ failure, and death”.

4.5 How do you avoid getting sepsis?

“How to Help Prevent Sepsis”

  1. “Get vaccinated against flu, pneumonia, and any other potential infections”.
  2. “Prevent infections that can lead to sepsis by: Cleaning scrapes and wounds and practicing good hygiene by washing hands and bathing regularly”.
  3. “If you have an infection, look for signs like: Fever and chills”.

4.6 Who is most at risk for sepsis?

“Those at the highest risk of developing sepsis include the very young and the very old (infants and seniors), as well as people with chronic or serious illnesses, such as diabetes and cancer, and those who have an impaired immune system”.

4.7 Can you still get sepsis while on antibiotics?

“Sepsis: When an Ordinary Infection Turns Deadly”

“An infection can also turn into sepsis when a prescribed antibiotic is ineffective”. (8 May 2018)

4.8 Can sepsis affect your eyes?

“It is defined as intraocular infection resulting from haematogenous spread of organisms in which the initial focus of infection is at a site distal to the eye. A red/sore eye in a patient with a known septic focus needs urgent attention as EE can be a major cause of visual loss”.

4.9 What are sepsis red flags?

“Clinical Presentation”

“Signs or symptoms of infection (e.g. wound infection or cellulitis, pneumonia, bladder infection). Chills and/or rigors. Rapid rise in temperature >38.3℃. Raised respiratory rate > 20 breaths/minute / raised heart rate or bradycardia. Confusion, anxiety, lethargy, clouded consciousness”.

4.10 Does sepsis come on suddenly?

“The signs and symptoms of sepsis following a bad infection are often subtle and can be mistaken for those of other serious conditions. However, sepsis typically involves the following main features in someone who has had a recent infection, and symptoms can come on quickly”.

4.11 What does sepsis look like on the skin?

“People with sepsis often develop a hemorrhagic rash—a cluster of tiny blood spots that look like pinpricks in the skin. If untreated, these gradually get bigger and begin to look like fresh bruises. These bruises then join together to form larger areas of purple skin damage and discoloration”.

4.12 Can you have sepsis without knowing?

“It’s clear that sepsis doesn’t occur without an infection in your body, but it is possible that someone develops sepsis without realizing they had an infection in the first place. And sometimes, doctors never discover what the initial infection was. (14 Dec 2018).

4.13 How fast can sepsis develop?

“When an infection reaches a certain point, this can happen in a matter of hours.” Sepsis usually starts out as an infection in just one part of the body, such as a skin wound or a urinary tract infection, Tracey says”. (29 Jan 2009)

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5. Sepsis and the “Elderly” (With illustrative examples)

5.1 Sepsis Common in Elderly

“Known in lay terms as blood poisoning, sepsis occurs when the bloodstream is overwhelmed with bacteria, usually in response to the body’s attempt to fight severe infection. People who become septic usually develop very low blood pressure, or shock”.

5.2 What are the symptoms of sepsis in the elderly?

These can include:

  • “Feeling dizzy or faint”.
  • “A change in mental state – such as confusion or disorientation”.
  • “Diarrhoea”.
  • “Nausea and vomiting”.
  • “Slurred speech”.
  • “Severe muscle pain”.
  • “Severe breathlessness”.
  • “Less urine production than normal – for example, not urinating for a day”.

5.3 What causes sepsis in elderly?

“Any type of infection can cause sepsis, from the flu to an infected bug bite, but the most common infections that trigger sepsis among older people are respiratory, such as pneumonia, or genitourinary, such as a urinary tract infection (UTI)”.

5.4 How long can an elderly person live with sepsis?

It’s known that many patients die in the months and years after sepsis. But no one has known if this increased risk of death (in the 30 days to 2 years after sepsis) is because of sepsis itself, or because of the pre-existing health conditions the patient had before acquiring the complication. (23 May 2016).

5.5 Can elderly recover from sepsis?

Oct. 26, 2010 — Sepsis is a leading cause of death in hospital ICUs, and the elderly are particularly vulnerable to the life-threatening blood infection. The thinking had been that once the crisis is over, older people who survive sepsis make full recoveries. But new research finds the opposite to be true. (26 Oct 2010).

5.6 Can an elderly person survive sepsis?

5.7 PROGNOSIS AND OUTCOMES OF SEVERE SEPSIS IN OLDER PATIENTS

There are high mortality rates of around 50%-60% in elderly patients with severe sepsis and septic shock[4,9,73]. The mortality due to severe sepsis in elderly patients is 1.3-1.5 times higher than that in younger cohorts[4,9]. (4 Feb 2012).

5.87 Aging Sepsis Alliance

“Any type of infection can cause sepsis, from the flu to an infected bug bite, but the most common infections that trigger sepsis among older people are respiratory”, …

5.9 Risk Factors for mortality in elderly and very elderly critically ill

“4 Feb 2019 – Mortality and age in patients with sepsis and septic shock. The overall hospital mortality was 48.8% (n = 727) and was significantly higher in very”..

5.10 Severe Sepsis and Sepsis Shock in the elderly:  An overview

4 Feb 2012 – In elderly patients, the most common source of sepsis is respiratory tract followed by genitourinary infections[4]. It is possible that the elderly are at increased risk of infection with multidrug-resistant organisms”.

5.10 Sepsis in Older Adults – Infectious Disease Clinics

Older adults with infection often present atypically, making prompt diagnosis and treatment initiation challenging. Fever, the most recognized clinical feature of”…

5.11 Sepsis: The Common Cause of Death You’ve Never Heard Of

Seniors are more vulnerable to the damaging effects of sepsis due to reduced immune function that occurs with age. Older individuals are also more likely to have”…

5.12 Sepsis Requires Urgent Attention – Todays Geriatric Medicine

“A significant and increasing threat to older adults, sepsis can go undetected or be misdiagnosed. And as patients age, they are more susceptible not only to this”…

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6. Sepsis and Children (With illustrative examples)

6.1 What are the symptoms of sepsis in children?

The signs and symptoms of sepsis can include a combination of any of the following:

  • “Fever or low temperature (newborns and infants may have low temperature)”
  • “Fast heart rate”.
  • “Fast breathing”.
  • “Feeling cold/cold hands and feet”.
  • “Clammy and pale skin”.
  • “Confusion, dizziness or disorientation”.
  • “Shortness of breath”. (More items…) (11 Sep 2017)

6.2 Does my child have sepsis?

“Immediate action required: Call 999 or go to A&E if a baby or young child has any of these symptoms of sepsis: blue, pale or blotchy skin, lips or tongue. a rash that does not fade when you roll a glass over it, the same as meningitis”.

6.3 Can a child survive sepsis?

“Nearly 7,000 will die, according to one 2013 study. That’s more than three times as many annual deaths as are caused by pediatric cancers. And some of the children who survive sepsis may suffer long-term consequences, including organ damage and amputated limbs”. (27 Apr 2017).

6.4 How do they test for sepsis in children?

“Blood tests. By examining a sample of blood, your child’s doctor can look for infection, abnormal liver or kidney function or poor oxygen levels, which could indicate sepsis. Urine tests. By examining a sample of urine, your child’s doctor can look for bacteria that could indicate sepsis”. (6 Jul 2017).

6.5 Sepsis in Children: Know the signs – Children’s Health

“11 Sep 2017 – Anyone can get an infection, and almost any infection can lead to sepsis—the body’s extreme response to an infection. Without timely treatment, sepsis (sometimes called septicaemia or septicemia) can rapidly lead to tissue damage, organ failure, and death”.

6.6 Children | Sepsis Alliance

“Neonatal sepsis occurs when a child develops sepsis within a few months of birth (up to 90 days). If the sepsis develops within 24 hours of birth, it is called early”…

6.7 Sepsis | NHS Inform

“13 Feb 2020 – Sepsis symptoms in older children and adults · a high temperature (fever) or low body temperature · chills and shivering · a fast heartbeat · fast”..

6.8 About Sepsis – Sepsis Trust

“If your child is unwell with either a fever or very low temperature (or has had a fever in the last 24 hours), call 999 and just ask: could it be sepsis? · Is breathing very” …

6.9 Sepsis (for Parents) – Nemours Kids Health

“By knowing the signs of sepsis, parents can get their children medical attention early, which can help in the treatment. Top Things to Know About Sepsis: Sepsis is”…

6.10 Septicaemia |Great Ormond Street Hospital

“We may also ask to test your child for coronavirus. Thank you for helping to keep everyone at GOSH safe. You can find more information and the latest updates”…

6.11 Sepsis in Children -WebMD

“4 Feb 2020 – Spotting Sepsis. Some signs of sepsis that may appear in a child of any age: Feels abnormally cold to the touch; Looks mottled, bluish,”…

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7. Treatments for Sepsis

7.1 Treatments

“The main treatment for sepsis, severe sepsis or septic shock is antibiotics. If you have severe sepsis and septic shock, antibiotics will be given directly into a vein (intravenously). Ideally, antibiotic treatment should start within an hour of diagnosis to reduce the risk of serious complications or death”. (13 Feb 2020)

7.2 What is the best treatment for sepsis?

They include:

  • “Antibiotics. Treatment with antibiotics should begin immediately”. …
  • “Intravenous fluids. People who have sepsis often receive intravenous fluids right away, usually within three hours”.
  • “Vasopressors”. (16 Nov 2018)

7.3 Treatment and recovery from Sepsis – NHS

Treatment for sepsis. Sepsis needs treatment in hospital straight away because it can get worse quickly. You should get antibiotics within 1 hour of arriving at”

7.4 How is Sepsis diagnosed and treated? | CDC

“Doctors and nurses should treat sepsis with antibiotics as soon as possible. Antibiotics are critical tools for treating life-threatening infections, like those that can”…

7.5 How is suspected Sepsis treated? |Information for the Public

“13 Jul 2016 – Remember that sepsis needs to be treated urgently because it can quickly get worse and lead to septic shock, which can be fatal. Treatment”…

7.6 Treatment | Sepsis Alliance

“The basics of sepsis treatment include intravenous (IV) fluids and antibiotics. But other medications and therapies may be needed”.

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8. Useful Links: World Sepsis Day – September 13th

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9. Our Final Thoughts and YouTube Video

We are very passionate about trying to share and spread awareness on matters that we feel are not necessarily highly recognised or well known about. That is why we could not miss the opportunity to publish this topic.

As we have said and mentioned quite often in past topics, life is precious, life is short, but it is also a gift. Something that is very important is our health, both mentally and physically.

Knowledge and awareness is powerful, and whilst we have this platform we will continue our best efforts to contribute to help making positive changes.

We wish anyone who reads this a blessed and safe remainder of the day, week ahead and weekend.

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