Communication and Grief- Coronavirus and Self Isolation

© Copyright 2019 Grief Probate Journey Blog *PLEASE NOTE THIS INFORMATION IS SOURCED FROM UK and AMERICAN WEBSITES* It is also based on our own experience. *We are not experts in this field, we are speaking purely on our own experience with information sought from the internet to give further examples. *

Please see: Communication and Grief which covers

  1. Introduction/our story
  2. Communication and Grief
  3. Coronavirus and Self-Isolation/Social Anxiety
  4. Our Final Thoughts and YouTube Video

1. Introduction/Our Story

With the situation we are in, quite often we feel like we want to withdraw from everything, not speak about anything, and just get on with what we have to do as best as possible.

Unfortunately, the processes we have gone through throughout this four-year period has had a significant impact on us. It has affected:

  • Our ability to have trust in certain professional organisations
  • Our ability to not take things personally and feel as though we are being attacked or patronised
  • Our ability to slow down, process, acknowledge and take in exactly what we are facing, going through, and dealing with.

Coronavirus and Communication

In the times we are living in, it can be quite easy to over isolate yourself. You can become to used to your routine and not move or do anything outside of that.

An example, you become so used to isolating during lockdown that the thought of going out and doing something other than exercise, essential shopping could feel so far from anything you could imagine doing again.

Also just the simple action of communicating with family and friends can make so much of a difference, bring you back into a “reality” “normality “ which is very much needed as these things can get lost in the moment of living through this pandemic.

This is definitely how I have been feeling during this pandemic. And it is only in moments that I break out of the strict lockdown measures that I realise what I am missing from how life was pre coronavirus.

An example, you become so used to isolating during lockdown that the thought of going out and doing something other than exercise, essential shopping could feel so far from anything you could imagine doing again.

Also just the simple action of communicating with family and friends can make so much of a difference, bring you back into a “reality” “normality “ which is very much needed as these things can get lost in the moment of living through this pandemic.

This is definitely how I have been feeling during this pandemic. And it is only in moments that I break out of the strict lockdown measures that I realise what I am missing from how life was pre coronavirus. Through the support of friends and family I am starting to try and live life more. I will also be taking part in counselling focused on life after the pandemic to try and help me to get better with being comfortable in the current “new normal”.

Please see Communication and Grief:

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2. Communication and Grief

2.1 Coping With Grief: The Importance of Open Communication

Friends and relatives of the departed may have a hard time communicating their feelings of grief and sadness to one another, or even to”…

My sister and I can relate to many of the examples within this article. One, in particular, talking about things too much. This is both with family and friends. For me personally, whilst our Dad was in the hospital, and to this day, I don’t really go into much detail of how I feel, I think both my sister and I are the same with each other, we do not want to upset each other, we are trying to support each other to have the strength to get through our continued duties since our Dad passed away.

Creating this blog, was a way that we could briefly discuss things, and then direct people to it so that they could find out more should they wish to.

2.2 Communication Grief – ResearchGate

Communicating Grief | Efforts Have Been Made To Suggest Ways For People To Communicate With Those Going Through The Bereavement” ..

2.3 10 ways To Communicate  Compassionately With A Grieving Friend

“17 Oct 2016 · 10 Ways To Communicate Compassionately With A Grieving Friend · 1. Don’t be afraid to just show up. · 2. Listen more and talk less .”.

2.4 Grief Coping and Communication

“Grief, Coping and Communication. Grief is experienced whenever you lose something important to you. It may be after a loss of a loved one or a significant life”.

2.5 Languages of Grief: a model for understanding the expressions of the bereaved

Introduction. Grief is universal. Its oral and nonverbal expression varies across cultures as well as individuals, and is a response to loss or anticipated loss. Grief and the expression of grief is an articulation not only of loss but potentially of gain, growth, and the birth pangs of a new personal synthesis”. (by IB Corless – ‎2014 – ‎Cited by 25 – ‎Related articles)

2.6 What does Grief Response Mean?

Grief is a natural response to loss. It’s the emotional suffering you feel when something or someone you love is taken away. Often, the pain of loss can feel overwhelming. You may experience all kinds of difficult and unexpected emotions, from shock or anger to disbelief, guilt, and profound sadness”.

2.7 A New Way to Communicate With Families Through Grief & Tragedy – Funeralone

“8 Oct 2019 · … coping with tragedy to offer the “ ABLE” communication formula to those working closely with grieving families who are in the midst of a tragedy”..

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3. Coronavirus and Self-Isolation/Social Anxiety

3.1 Coronavirus: six facts about loneliness you need to know

Coronavirus and isolation: helpful things to remember about loneliness … Even though so many of us so often feel lonely, too many of us are ashamed to admit it”…

3.2 Coping With Feeling Lonely In Coronavirus Self-Isolation

“People want to hear from you, just as much as you need social contact too. So, pick up the phone, video call or message those who you are close to – for your”…

3.3 Social Isolation & Coronavirus: 11 Ways to Manage Your Anxiety

“18 May 2020 – Isolation during the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic can quickly weigh … Avoid thinking too much about the future or worst-case scenarios”.

3.4 Loneliness During Coronavirus | Mental Health Foundation

This shows great resilience during this time of isolation and shows that many of … Doing good is good for our mental health, so now could a good opportunity to”…

4. Our Final Thoughts and YouTube video

 As we have said in past topics, we are living through extremely:

  • Trying times
  • Testing times
  • Uncertain times

These things could possibly affect self confidence, as well as our mental health and wellbeing. We are also aware that communicating with people during times of difficulty could be a good way of helping to get through such times.

We hope this topic might be of use to someone and we wish anyone reading this a safe morning, afternoon, evening and week ahead.

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