Men’s Health Week: 14 – 20th June 2021

Preview to topic:

We discovered this awareness week last year for the first time. We were so happy to have come across it and be able to do it as a topic. That is why this year we are doing it again without any thought or hesitation.

All health is important, but for men, their health does not necessarily the same attention that women’s health does…….

Please see Men’s Health Week: 14 – 20th June 2021 which covers:

  1. Introduction
  2. YouTube Video: Men’s Health Week 2021
  3. Illustrative examples: Men’s Health Week 2021
  4. Men’s Health Week 2021
  5. YouTube Video Testicular Cancer
  6. Illustrative examples: Testicular Cancer
  7. Testicular Cancer
  8. Our Final Thoughts/YouTube Video

© Copyright 2019 Grief Probate Journey Blog *PLEASE NOTE THIS INFORMATION IS SOURCED FROM UK and AMERICAN WEBSITES* It is also based on our own experience. *We are not experts in this field, we are speaking purely on our own experience with information sought from the internet to give further examples. *

1. Introduction

We discovered this awareness week last year for the first time. We were so happy to have come across it and be able to do it as a topic. That is why this year we are doing it again without any thought or hesitation.

All health is important, but for men, their health does not necessarily get the same attention that women’s health does.

Just like grief is a taboo subject, so is Men’s health and Men’s grief, it is equally important, and this is why we are happy to be able to aid in spreading and sharing awareness of this important cause. We feel it is just as important for Men’s health and wellbeing to be acknowledged and spoken about.

Our journey and blog started because of our dad being hospitalised in September 2016. He was diagnosed with a rare and life-threatening heart condition: Infective Endocarditis. We had never heard of this before, and we would never have imagined that such a serious and life-threatening condition could start from the gums. Sadly our Dad passed away in March 2017 (We have a topic on Infective Endocarditis).

The aim of our blog is to try our very best to help spread awareness of matters of this kind, grief, and general health and wellbeing.

Please see Men’s Health Week: 14 – 20th June 2021

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2. YouTube Video: Men’s Health Week 2021

Who’s on your team? |Men’s Health Week 2021

 

48,075 views

•17 May 2021

“What is a team?… A team is a group of people, all working together towards a common goal. They have your back, they can build you up, they’ll be there for the good times and the tough times, and fill a gap when you need support. You are the number one player in your team, but you can also be a part of other people’s teams”.

“Why do you need a team?… You need teammates to support your physical, mental, and social health. Depending on what is happening in your life you’ll need certain people, services, and information on your team at different times”.

“Who’s on your team?… It’s important to include health and medical professionals on your team — they can support you to maintain your health and wellbeing by stopping small problems before they get bigger. If something goes wrong with your health, already having health and medical professionals on your team can help make managing these challenging times a bit easier. We suggest you have a doctor, or GP, on your team at all times”.

“Physical, mental, and social health are all connected, and there are ways you can build your team to support these important areas”.

“To support your physical health… Looking after your physical health is important. This includes getting the support you need to make healthy food choices, stay physically active and get good sleep. Teammates that can help to look after your physical health may be friends and family, sporting clubs, colleagues, doctors, physios, trainers, and dietitians. To support your mental health… If you’ve been feeling irritable, down, worried, nervous, tired, or avoiding people or places that used to make you happy, there are lots of people and services that can join your team to support your mental health. These include a trusted friend or family member, your doctor, or a counsellor or psychologist, online and phone support services, like MensLine or LifeLine, and HeadtoHealth — an online mental health resource portal”.

“To support your social health… Staying socially connected with your team is more important than you might think. Catching up in person is great — whether that be through organised activities or groups, or just spending quality time with friends and family. Phone, email and chatting online can help keep you connected, even if you can’t get out in-person”.

“To learn more about men’s health and how you can build your team, visit healthymale.org.au”.

“Information provided on the Healthy Male YouTube Channel is not a substitute for medical advice. If you have any concerns or questions about your health, we recommend making an appointment to see a doctor”.

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3. Illustrative examples: Men’s Health Week 2021

 

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4. Men’s Health Week 2021

4.1 Men, mental health and Covid-19 | Men’s Health Forum

“The CAN DO Challenge · Five ways to wellbeing · Men’s Health Week 14-21 June 2021 · Men’s Health Week 14-21 June 2021”.

4.2 Men’s Health Week |Healthwatch

“(14 Jun 2021) — Men’s Health Week raises awareness of the health issues that affect men disproportionately and focuses on getting men to become more”…

4.3 What can I do for Men’s Health Week?

“Promoting awareness of men’s approach to health. Changing the way health care is provided to be more sensitive towards men’s needs. Creating school and community programs which target boys and young men. Connecting health and social policies to better pursue men’s health goals”.

4.4 Men’s Health Week 2021 | Guides – Chemist 4 U

Men’s Health Week 2021 is aiming to help men move forward with a new approach to their mental wellness: the CAN DO challenge”.

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5. YouTube Video: Testicular Cancer

5.1 Testicular Cancer Self-Exam – Testicular Cancer Foundation

 

Testicular Cancer Foundation

“For more Information About Testicular Cancer Check out”: http://testicularcancer.org/media/vid…

“THE MISSION Testicular Cancer Foundation (Team Single Jingles) provides education and support to young men to raise awareness about testicular cancer, the #1 cancer among men ages 15 – 35”.

“Additionally, Testicular Cancer Foundation invests significant time helping families, speaking to groups and sharing its mission and resources with the medical and healthcare communities, schools and wherever groups of young men can be reached”.

“At the Testicular Cancer Foundation we want to break through all the stigma that is Testicular Cancer and in order to make sure that all men know the importance of self exams. We believe this video really breaks through those barriers! Testicular Cancer is the most common cancer in males ages 15-35 and beatable 99% of the time if caught at stage 1! This is why our education materials are so important”!

“Self exams are easy and can save your life. A simple 60 second exam in the shower is easy and should be done once a month. Watch this video to learn how”.

“Testicular Cancer Foundation provides education and support to young men to raise awareness about testicular cancer, the most commonly diagnosed cancer among males ages 15 — 35. TCF supports families of testicular cancer patients and shares its resources with the medical and healthcare communities, schools and various young men’s groups”.

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6. Illustrative examples: Testicular Cancer

 

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7. Testicular Cancer

7.1 Testicular Cancer – NHS

“How common is testicular cancer? Testicular cancer is a relatively rare type of cancer, accounting for just 1% of all cancers that occur in men. Around 2,300 men”…

7.2 What is usually the first sign of testicular cancer?

“Usually, an enlarged testicle or a small lump or area of hardness are the first signs of testicular cancer. Any lump, enlargement, hardness, pain, or tenderness should be evaluated by a doctor as soon as possible”.

7.3 What are 5 warning signs of testicular cancer?

“Five Common Signs of Testicular Cancer”

  • “A painless lump, swelling or enlargement of one or both testes”.
  • “Pain or heaviness in the scrotum”.
  • “A dull ache or pressure in the groin, abdomen or low back”.
  • “A general feeling of malaise, including unexplained fatigue, fever, sweating, coughing, shortness of breath or mild chest pains”.
  • “Headache and confusion”. (31 Mar 2017)

7.4 Is testicular cancer deadly?

“Testicular cancer is a potentially deadly disease. Although it accounts for only 1.2% of all cancers in males, cancer of the testis accounts for about 11%-13% of all cancer deaths of men between the ages of 15-35”.

7.5 What happens when a man has testicular cancer?

“A painless lump in the testicle (the most common sign) Swelling of the testicle (with or without pain) or a feeling of weight in the scrotum. Pain or a dull ache in the testicle, scrotum or groin. Tenderness or changes in the male breast tissue”.

7.6 Does testicular cancer spread fast?

“Seminomas tend to grow and spread more slowly than nonseminomas, which are more common, accounting for roughly 60 percent of all testicular cancers. How quickly a cancer spreads will vary from patient to patient”.

7.7 What is the average age for testicular cancer?

“Testis cancer is most common in men in their late 20s and early 30s, with an average age of diagnosis of 33 years old”.

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8. Our final thoughts/YouTube video

We hope this video will be of use to those who read it. We woud also like to wish you a safe day, evening, night and week ahead.

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