National Grief Awareness Week: 2nd – 8th December 2022

This week is National Grief Awareness Week. Grief is a very powerful emotion. There are many levels to it, there are no guidelines or rulebooks, and we all travel along our individual journeys day by day making it through….

Please see National Grief Awareness Week: 2nd – 8th December 2022 which covers:

  1. Introduction
  2. National Grief Awareness Week 2nd – 8th December 2022
  3. Sue Ryder: Empty Chair Campaign
  4. Ways to be supportive of someone grieving
  5. Our Final Thoughts
  6. Our YouTube video

© Copyright 2019 Grief Probate Journey Blog *PLEASE NOTE THIS INFORMATION IS SOURCED FROM UK and AMERICAN WEBSITES* It is also based on our own experience. *We are not experts in this field, we are speaking purely on our own experience with information sought from the internet to give further examples. *

1. Introduction

This week is National Grief Awareness Week. Grief is a very powerful emotion. There are many levels to it, there are no guidelines or rulebooks, and we all travel along our individual journeys day by day making it through.

Grief is as individual as a fingerprint, we all have our own unique experiences. No two people will experience Grief in the same way.

The past few years have been extremely challenging. The coronavirus and the worldwide pandemic completely changed life as we once knew it. It brought new meanings and concepts to everything including Grief. During the pandemic losses were immense.

  • Loss of loved ones
  • The life we once knew
  • Job losses
  • Loss of home
  • Loss of identity

These are just a small few examples. What made these times even more challenging was:

  • Shielding
  • Self-isolating
  • Social distancing
  • Lockdown

This meant when going through such difficult times you couldn’t be around people face to face. This affected:

  • Funerals
  • Weddings
  • Human aspect

With most things moving online, the way loved ones were honoured had to change. Thankfully we have now moved through those times.

We are now in the period of holidays, a time when we are now actually able to be with people in person, sadly for some there will be people missing who may have passed away before, during and since the pandemic. It will make this time of year even more difficult. This is why we will always try our best to promote Grief Awareness. In this topic, we have useful information from The Good Grief Trust. We also have a link to a campaign by Sue Ryder it is an inspiring and invaluable Campaign that is aiming to encourage the Nation to be more Grief Kind. Something that is always necessary, but even more so during these times.

Please see National Grief Awareness Week: 2nd – 8th December 2022:

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2. National Grief Awareness Week 2nd – 8th December 2022

2.1 National Grief Awareness Week

“To raise awareness of the impact of grief. Grief needs immediate acknowledgement; When early access to a choice of support is not offered”.

2.2 National Grief Awareness Week

“National Grief Awareness Week exists to raise awareness of all aspects of grief and loss on a national scale, and also to signpost channels of support for”…

2.3 National Grief Awareness Week 2022

“We are hosting a free online bereavement information event entitled: ‘Living with Loss’ on the 8th December 2022. Head to our Eventbrite page to register. We”…

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3. Sue Ryder:  Empty Chair Campaign

3.1 The Empty Chair: encouraging the Nation to be more Grief Kind

(15 Nov 2022) — “As part of the Grief Kind campaign, Sue Ryder have installed a dining table surrounded by 13 empty chairs at Victoria Leeds”.

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4. Ways to be supportive of someone grieving

4.1 Talking to Child about Grief  – BBC Tiny Happy People

“Tips on where to start with difficult conversations about death, loss and grief. How to talk to your young child about death, loss and grief. Helpful Tips & Ideas. Free Activities. Advice from Experts”.

4.2 What to say to someone who is deeply grieving?

“Things that can be helpful”

“Say how sorry you are”. …

“Share a memory”. …

“Offer them space to talk”. …

“Tell them however they feel is OK”. …

“Recognise how hard it is for them”. …

“Ask if there is anything they need”. …

“Tell them you’re thinking of them”. …

“Sometimes you don’t need to say anything”.

4.3 What is the best thing to do for someone grieving?

The Do’s

“Check in on them. Make an effort to check in with your friend, even if it is a quick phone call, a card or an invitation to grab a coffee together”. …

“Understand the grieving process”. …

“Listen more, talk less”. …

“Let them cry”. …

“Ask questions”. …

“Offer practical help”. …

“Be willing to sit in silence”. …

“Remember important dates”. ( Aug 2022)

4.4 What are five ways to support a grieving person?

“5 ways to support a grieving friend or relative”

“Talk about it. It is normal to feel scared about making things more difficult or painful”. …

“Make promises that you can keep”. …

“Stay in touch”. …

“Remember that everyone experiences grief differently”. …

“Give them time”. (24 Jan 2018)

4.5 How do you comfort a grieving person?

Here are some ways you can give support to someone who is grieving:

“Be a good listener”. …

“Respect the person’s way of grieving”. …

“Accept mood swings”. …

“Avoid giving advice”. …

“Refrain from trying to explain the loss”. …

“Help out with practical tasks”. …

“Stay connected and available”. …

“Offer words that touch the heart”. (1 Jul 2018)

4.6 What is the most valuable thing someone can do to support a person who is grieving a loss?

“Listen well instead of advising”.

“A sympathetic ear is a wonderful thing. A friend who listens even when the same story is told with little variation is even better. Often, people work through grief and trauma by telling their story over and over. Unless you are asked for your advice, don’t be quick to offer it”.

4.7 What should you not say to someone grieving?

“How are you doing?”

“You’ll be okay after a while.”

“I understand how you feel.”

“You shouldn’t feel that way.”

“Stop crying.”

“At least he’s in a better place; his suffering is over.”

“At least she lived a long life, many people die young.”

“She brought this on herself.” (8 Sept 2020)

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5. Our Final Thoughts

We hope this topic will be of use to those who read it.

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6. Our YouTube video

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