Triggers Anxiety and Grief

Preview to the topic:

My sister and I are aware the moment our Dad was hospitalised in September 2016 to this very day our anxiety has gone through the roof. We are also aware that triggers can transport us back to moments of the trauma of our Dad’s situation, making us feel like we are literally back in that very moment. But at times when it hits you in ways it hasn’t ever before, it’s almost like an eye-opener and wake up call.

Please see Triggers Anxiety and Grief which covers:

  1. Introduction
  2. Quotes: Triggers Anxiety and Grief
  3. Anxiety and Grief
  4. Generalised Anxiety Disorder
  5. Triggers and Grief
  6. Our Final Thoughts/Our YouTube Video

© Copyright 2019 Grief Probate Journey Blog *PLEASE NOTE THIS INFORMATION IS SOURCED FROM UK and AMERICAN WEBSITES* It is also based on our own experience. *We are not experts in this field, we are speaking purely on our own experience with information sought from the internet to give further examples. *

1. Introduction

My sister and I are aware the moment our Dad was hospitalised in September 2016 to this very day our anxiety has gone through the roof. We are also aware that triggers can transport us back to moments of the trauma of our Dad’s situation, making us feel like we are literally back in that very moment. But at times when it hits you in ways it hasn’t ever before, it’s almost like an eye-opener and wake up call.

we are also aware the pandemic has had a huge impact on our anxiety and mental state of mind. The worldwide pandemic has changed the way of life as we once knew it, and we are having to adapt to new ways of living.

It is a new experience for us all worldwide, it will affect us all differently, we will all find different ways of handling and getting through it.

Recognition and acknowledgement of our feelings is something that is even more important during these times.

We have topics on:

Despite having topics on these matters, I had a recent experience that shocked me. An experience that I wasn’t expecting. An experience that I was not prepared for.

I had to go to the hospital as I was unwell. My mind was focused on getting to the hospital in time for my appointment.

When I arrived, I checked in and sat down to fill in my details. I then was called to another desk and asked a few questions. After that, I had to wait until I was called for my appointment.

It was at this point things instantly started to change for me.

The hospital radio was playing. The music was exactly the same as the songs that would play on the radio when my Dad was an inpatient in the hospital.

And just like that my mind and thoughts started getting transported back to those seven months of visiting my Dad daily at the hospital.

I tried to block it out of my mind and refocus.

Then I was called for my appointment. I had to go to a ward, which again made me start feeling weird. As if that was not enough, I was then taken to a room on my own. That room just topped it all off. Our Dad was in a room on his own due to his various infections after being diagnosed with Infective Endocarditis (We also have topics on: Infective Endocarditis and Infective Endocarditis and Blindness).

With all these things combined, on top of the fact this was my first time being in a hospital on my own since the pandemic, major anxiety started to kick in.

Of all the times I have been anxious, and it has affected me. This was different. My whole body and face broke out in hives. My eyes were swollen it was so uncomfortable and the more I was getting concerned about it, the bigger the hives would get.

I think what shocked me the most, and what made me feel so unprepared is the fact that I have been to hospitals many times since our Dad sadly passed away. Whenever possible we never go to the hospital where our Dad was an inpatient, so the fact this happened in a completely different hospital, it really threw me.

I was also feeling anxious as to what I looked like to staff that were talking to me. Because of the pandemic, I was worried I could look like something more was wrong with me. What probably made things worse was the fact that I was in the hospital, on my own, during the pandemic. Panic, worry and fear had most definitely kicked in.

I do not know how I did it, but I eventually managed to get myself to calm down enough for the hives to start going down. I kept reminding myself of people I know who have had procedures during the pandemic and have been perfectly fine. This was my pep talk to myself.

I also needed to do this as my blood pressure was high on all the readings, and as I am suffering from high blood pressure at the moment, I didn’t want to make it any worse.

Throughout our journey, my sister and I have had various counselling sessions to try and help us work our way through our grief. Just like our grief is a journey, so too is our learning and discovery of our new self and how it has and does still affect us. For these reasons, we wanted to do this as a topic.

Please see: Triggers Anxiety and Grief

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2. Quotes: Triggers Anxiety and Grief

2.1 Anxiety and Grief

2.2 Generalised Anxiety Disorder

2.3 Quotes: Triggers and Grief

2.4 Quotes: Grief

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3. Triggers Anxiety and Grief

3.1 Why Anxiety should be added to the 5 stages of grief?

“Including anxiety in the five stages of grief would better serve the bereaved. Even more than depression, anxiety is the response my grieving clients express a desire to overcome since experiencing loss. They describe feelings of panic and obsessive thinking about their own deaths and potential illness”. (11 Feb 2013).

3.2 Why does my anxiety get triggered so easily?

Stress. Daily stressors like traffic jams or missing your train can cause anyone anxiety. But long-term or chronic stress can lead to long-term anxiety and worsening symptoms, as well as other health problems. Stress can also lead to behaviors like skipping meals, drinking alcohol, or not getting enough sleep. (1 May 2018).

3.3 Can grief be triggered?

“Certain reminders of your loved one might be inevitable, such as a visit to the loved one’s grave, the anniversary of the person’s death, holidays, birthdays or new events you know he or she would have enjoyed. Even memorial celebrations for others can trigger the pain of your own loss”.

3.4 What are the six triggers of grief?

Grief triggers can elicit anger, anxiety, crying, guilt, lack of motivation, and loneliness; by knowing and being aware of these feelings, you are already on your way to progressing out of your grief. The next step is to accept the fact that anything can trigger your feelings of loss. (29 Mar 2018).

3.5 Is anxiety a side effect of grief?

“Anxiety is a common part of the grieving process, but if your anxiety symptoms do not dissipate after 6 months after the loss of a loved one, you may be experiencing a complicated grief or an anxiety disorder. Anxiety isn’t one of the five stages of grief, but many mental health professionals suggest that it should be”. (6 Sept 2019).

3.6 Anxiety in Grief – Whats your Grief

“Using a personal example, I remember feeling panic-like anxiety when my father told me of my mother’s terminal cancer diagnosis, and then the slow hum of”…

3.7 Anxiety and panic | The Loss Foundation

“Heart racing; Sweating Shaking; Pins & Needles; Breathing faster; Feeling nauseous/needing the toilet; Feeling lightheaded; Increased muscle tension. These”…

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4. Generalised Anxiety Disorder

4.1 Living with GAD & panic attacks after losing my Dad – Mind

“(23 May 2016 )— Zoe shares her experience of living with Generalised Anxiety Disorder after her Dad passed away”.

4.2 Grief-induced anxiety: Calming the fears that follow loss | CNN

“(18 Jul 2021) — When we are grieving, we spend a lot of time dwelling in the past and fretting about the future, therapist Claire Bidwell Smith says. (CNN)”…

4.3 Jobs for People With Generalised Anxiety Disorder

“The best jobs for people with generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) are those that make the most use of your strengths. While living with GAD may mean that you have a tendency to worry and overanalyze, it may also mean that you are good at gathering information or investigating problems”.

4.4 Treatment options for Generalised Anxiety Disorder

“Everyone experiences anxiety. But people with generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) are frequently distracted by their worries, avoidant of activities that might stir up the anxiety, and “on edge” without explanation. In most cases of GAD, the anxiety negatively impacts the individual’s relationships and/or performance at school or work”.

4.5 Causes and Risk Factors of Generalised Anxiety Disorder

“There is no singular cause of generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) that has been identified. Evidence has shown that multiple factors are usually at play, influencing the development of GAD.1. Some of the common factors include things like genetic predisposition, brain chemistry, family background, social influence, and life experiences”.

4.6 What is and how to treat generalised anxiety disorder

“Generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) causes feelings of intense anxiety, worry, or nervousness about everyday life. People with GAD struggle to control these feelings, and the condition tends to interfere with daily activities and personal relationships”.

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5. Triggers and Grief

5.1 Triggers in grief |The Loss Foundation

“Unexpected triggers can pop up day-to-day catching you off guard with your grief and bringing on a surge of emotions, whether it be walking down a” …

5.2 What is a grief trigger?

“Grief triggers are those reminders, often unexpected, that in an instant can cause a wave of grief to wash over you or even knock you down. You become distracted from what you were doing and find yourself in pain. A grief trigger can be anything that brings up memories related to your loss”.

5.3 What are the six triggers of grief?

“Grief triggers can elicit anger, anxiety, crying, guilt, lack of motivation, and loneliness; by knowing and being aware of these feelings, you are already on your way to progressing out of your grief. The next step is to accept the fact that anything can trigger your feelings of loss”. (29 Mar 2018)

5.4 What types of loss can trigger the grieving process?

“You may associate grieving with the death of a loved one—which is often the cause of the most intense type of grief—but any loss can cause grief, including: Divorce or relationship breakup. Loss of health. Losing a job”.

5.5 6 Strategies to Overcome Triggers During Your Grief Recovery

“(29 Mar 2018) — The pain of loss and other emotions that come along with loss can be challenging to cope with. It is necessary to enlist the help of” …

5.6 How to Recognise Your Grief Triggers: Step-By-Step | Cake Blog

“(24 Sept 2020) — Grief triggers can be best described as sudden reminders that your loved one has died that generate powerful emotional responses within you”.

5.7 What Does it Mean To Recognise Your Grief Triggers? – Death

“If you are in the process of grieving a loss, you may wonder what it means to recognize your grief triggers and want to better understand why some feel as”.

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6. Our Final Thoughts/Our YouTube Video

We hope this topic might be of use to those who read it.

Our YouTube Video:

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